ASA

Grandin says, “When the opportunity arises, you got to go for it.      |      

Temple Grandin, a world-renowned professor of animal sciences at Colorado State University for the last 26 years and outspoken advocate and role model for people with autism, will be inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in September. Grandin barged through many barriers in the science world both as a woman and as somebody diagnosed with autism. She is a pioneer in the field of animal welfare, the author of several books and articles, and was portrayed by Claire Danes in the 2010 HBO film, “Temple Grandin.”

On her way to speak to graduate students in Edinburgh, Scotland, Grandin, 69, discussed her work, where she believes the future of education is in “quirky” people like herself.

Q: What was your reaction when you found out you were going to be inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame?

A: I was really excited about that. I found out a couple months ago but they said I couldn’t tell anybody about it until it was official. I didn’t tell anybody but now I’m telling everybody.

Q: What does being in the hall of fame mean to you?

A: I was one of first girls working with cattle and you had to be good at what you did. I was just determined that I could do it and make myself good at what I did. When I started, the only women working in feedyards were the secretaries. I got a reputation for writing good, accurate articles for the farmer’s ranch magazine. I covered cattle meetings, but then I got the opportunity to design something and I wanted to make myself the best at it.

Q: Many consider you an inspiration, especially for women and those who are on the autism spectrum. What do you hope those people take away?

A: You’ve got to work hard I found, especially when I started. Like I said, I had to be twice as good as a man. I’ve been at a site where a man could totally screw up the construction and still have a job. I’m talking a million dollar project. You just had to make yourself really good. I saw that movie, “Hidden Figures,” and they were discriminated against, and it was horrible but they were going to prove they could do it and they were the ones who were going to calculate John Glenn into space. One of things I want to point out is I never went to any protests or marches or participated in that kind of stuff.

Sometimes you have to just go through a door when there’s a door. There was a scabies outbreak in the cattle in Arizona and the way you treated them was by putting the cattle through dipping vat. I was offered to design the vat and I said,”Yes, I will do it.” It took me three weeks just to get the drawings together for it and I had a total of five of those projects.  When opportunity arises, you gotta go for it. The thing is, you never know where a door is going to be.

Continue reading

Leading the BIF Mission

By Beef Improvement Federation       |      

When your passion in genetics and seedstock marketing sparks during your grade school years, you have more time than most to make a mark on the industry. This year’s Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) President Martin “Marty” Ropp has spent his lifetime making a difference in the livestock business and in recent years specifically the beef industry.

Marty will end his one-year term as president at the 2017 BIF Research Symposium and Convention May 31 to June 3 in Athens, Georgia. (See sidebar about this year’s symposium and convention.)

“Marty has been a visionary leader,” says Jane Parish, BIF executive director. “While on the board he has always looked to the future and considered what we need to be doing as an organization in the next 10 to 20 years to be relevant and successful. He championed our young producers program and has taken an active role in program planning.”

BIF’s mission is to help improve the beef industry by promoting greater acceptance of performance evaluation. Parish says Marty has been a “behind-the-scenes advocate” his entire career promoting the BIF mission.

“Through better and tougher times, genetic improvement priority needs to be constant,” Marty says. “Pregnant, long-lived cows that don’t eat us out of house and home, that have live, fast-growing, healthy calves and a beef product that everyone enjoys to eat are always the genetic goal. It’s not a simple proposition, but is the only way we can promote profit up and down the beef chain.

“We (the beef industry) must keep the hammer down and promote the use of genetic improvement tools. Both tried-and-true profit-building technologies like EPDs (expected progeny differences), selection indexes and crossbreeding, along with the new opportunities brought about by the DNA era, need to be employed to create the benefits they offer.”

Growing up

Originally from Normal, Illinois, Marty grew up involved in the swine seedstock industry. When he was in grade school he started a purebred Chester White business with his family. It continued until 2015. 

“In those days everyone with a will and a set of stock racks could be a successful seedstock producer, even a young upstart,” he says. “Times have really changed in the pig breeding business, and now I use those lessons for decision making every day in the beef business.  Watching nearly everyone I knew and looked up to go out of business — and in some cases lose everything they worked for — to changes in the swine industry had a profound effect on my life.”

After graduating from high school, he attended Kansas State University where he received his bachelor’s degree in animal sciences and industry (’86) and was a member of the livestock judging team. He then obtained his master’s degree in swine genetics and management from the University of Missouri (MU). While at MU, Marty taught for five years and during that time coached the livestock and meat animal evaluation teams.

Today he continues to judge a few livestock shows throughout the country and has volunteered countless hours in educating youth about opportunities and the potential rewarding futures for them in the livestock industry.

Marty transitioned from teaching to extension in 1994, serving as the MU regional livestock specialist for three years and then as an extension swine specialist in Michigan for two more.

In 1988, Marty joined the staff at the American Simmental Association (ASA). He wore many hats while at ASA. In addition to coordinating ASA’s commercial marketing, seedstock marketing and field staff services, he coordinated and grew the long-running ASA Young Sire Evaluation Program. He built the program into the industry’s largest structured sire test, with hundreds of sires of several breeds being tested through the years.

Much of the credit for his successful tenure in Bozeman he gives to his boss and mentor Dr. Jerry Lipsey. “Jerry has been a pioneer in the beef business and in the field of education at all levels for most of his life. He gave me the opportunity to pursue my passion for genetics and had a huge effect on how I see this business and the world.”

While at ASA, Marty worked diligently to build bridges between all segments of the industry — cow-calf, feedlot, packers and seedstock. An accomplished speaker with a keen sense of humor, he is in great demand at field days, educational programs and seminars throughout the country. His strong communication skills and sound advice have earned him widespread accolades and respect.

While at the ASA, he received the Golden Book award from the World Simmental Federation for distinguished service.

After 12 years with ASA, Marty moved back to Normal, Illinois, and founded Allied Genetic Resources. With more than 80 owners specializing in the production and marketing of SimAngus, Simmental, Angus, Red Angus, Gelbvieh, Balancer and Shorthorn commercial bulls, Allied is one of the largest coordinated seedstock businesses in the United States, marketing nearly 9,000 bulls annually.

Allied currently has five full-time employees and is focused on customer service opportunities for the commercial customer base of its ownership. It is designed as a support business for these independent producers, enabling them to offer value-added options not easily available to them as individual producers. The commercial customer base of the Allied ownership is around 4,500 producers with an estimate of nearly 1 million commercial females.

BIF involvement

Marty attended his first BIF Research Symposium and Convention in 2000 in Wichita, Kansas.

“The BIF convention is among the very best of the beef industry conventions and a gathering of committed participants every year,” Marty says. “Almost all of us involved had our first experience with BIF as a convention participant and, because of the experience there, ultimately became more involved with the larger purpose of the organization.

“BIF is a first-class organization of the best beef genetics professionals in the world. All levels of the industry are represented among the leadership of the organization and it is one of the most altruistic and industry-serving groups I have had the privilege to work with. That is rare these days.”

In 2011, Marty was presented the BIF Continuing Service Award for his significant contribution to the industry and for his efforts toward large-scale genetic information collection and promotion of change.

Marty was elected to the BIF board in 2012, and through the years has served on multiple committees, including the on-going beef cattle research funding project.

“The board has absolutely grown in terms of our activity level since 2012. One thing that I don’t know that everyone realizes is that the BIF board is made up of an elected body of producers that have voting responsibilities and then a very large group of members representing all other facets of the beef genetics research community and business,” he explains.

In 1968 BIF was formed as a means to standardize programs and methodologies, and to create greater awareness, acceptance and usage of performance concepts in beef production. The organization’s three-leaf clover logo would come to represent industry, extension and research, just as the organization’s annual symposium would become the premier forum bringing industry segments together to discuss and evaluate performance topics.

 “Research supporting livestock production and, in turn, producers applying technology and supporting research is the model that BIF represents and promotes,” he adds. “That system makes good sense to me, particularly in today’s relatively uncoordinated beef production system in the world.”

Marty will pass the BIF reigns to the next president on Friday, June 2, but there’s no doubt his passion and commitment to BIF’s principles and goals will continue for years to come.  

The CattleFax Trends+ Cow-Calf Webinar will be on May 24, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. MT. 

Have the lows been established for the cattle industry? With the magnitude of the breaks and rallies that we have experienced across the entire cattle industry thus far that question is on everyone’s mind. An upcoming, free CattleFax webinar will address that question as well as provide an outlook for the cow-calf and entire beef industry for 2017.

CattleFax analysts will discuss a variety of topics in the one-hour session, including:

-- Cattle and feedstuff market projections for the next 12 to 18 months

-- Calf market outlook through Summer and Fall of 2017

-- Analysis of a recent Cow-Calf Survey conducted by CattleFax

Register here

Chris Martin, of Nashville, TN has been involved in the registered seedstock cattle industry since he received his first crossbred Simmental heifer at the age of 8. Chris purchased his first black Simmental cattle in 1990 and later introduced Angus genetics into his breeding program, anticipating the popularity and market acceptance of SimAngusTM. He currently serves as farm manager of Water’s Edge Farm in Franklin and works with his father on the family operation, Martin Farms, Lyles. His family began utilizing AI in 1971 to incorporate Simmental genetics into a commercial crossbred cow herd. Chris serves as secretary of the Tennessee Simmental Association and editor of the state association newsletter, The Tennessee Simmental SCOOP. He has three teenage daughters: Claire, Kendall, and Sorrell who show Hereford cattle.
 
Chris received a bachelor degree in animal science from the University of Tennessee where he participated on the meats and livestock judging teams. He also holds a master’s in ruminant nutrition from Southern Illinois University and a BFA in graphic design from Watkins College of Art. In addition to his other duties, Chris enjoys designing sale catalogs and ads as a freelance graphic designer. 

Nathanael M. Thompson, Eric A. DeVuyst, B. Wade Brorsen, and Jayson L. Lusk     |     

We estimate the value of using genetic information to make fed cattle marketing decisions. Efficiency gains result from sorting cattle into marketing groups, including more accurate optimal days-on-feed and reduced variability of returns to cattle feeding. The value of using genetic information to selectively market cattle ranged from $1–$13/head depending on how a producer currently markets cattle and the grid structure. Although these values of genetic information were generally higher than those reported in previous research, they were still not enough to offset the current cost of genetic testing (about $40/head). Key words: fed cattle marketing, genetics, molecular breeding value, risk aversion, value of information

Introduction The beef industry has promoted value-based marketing strategies since the early 1990s in an effort to improve the quality and consistency of beef products (Value-Based Marketing Task Force, 1990). Most notably, grid pricing, introduced in the mid–1990s, provides transparent price signals. Traditional cash pricing mechanisms, such as live weight and dressed weight pricing, are not based on the actual quality and yield grade of carcasses. As a result, above-average cattle are paid less than their cutout value and below-average cattle are paid more than their cutout value. Therefore, traditional pricing mechanisms inhibit information flow from beef consumers to cattle producers (Feuz, Fausti, and Wagner, 1993; Fausti, Feuz, and Wagner, 1998). Grid pricing, on the other hand, determines value based on the carcass merit of individual animals. Premiums and discounts that make up the grid reflect consumer preferences and transmit these signals upstream to cattle producers. Feedback on individual carcass performance and value provides an incentive for producers to make necessary changes to “their breeding, feeding, and sorting programs” (Johnson and Ward, 2005, p. 562). The National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA) reported that the share of fed cattle marketed on a grid increased from 15% in 1995 to 34% in 2005 (National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, 2006). However, grid pricing has yet to become the dominant fed cattle marketing strategy as many had projected (Schroeder et al., 2002), accounting for only 40%–45% of fed cattle marketings (Fausti et al., 2010). Ample literature has investigated producer incentives and disincentives to adopt grid pricing, and the fundamental marketing risk created by the system has been identified as the primary barrier to adoption (Fausti, Feuz, and Wagner, 1998; Anderson and Zeuli, 2001; Fausti and Qasmi, 2002). Depending on the sample period, live weight, dressed weight, or grid pricing can have the highest returns, but variability is consistently highest for grid pricing (Feuz, Fausti, and Wagner, 1993; Schroeder and Graff, 2000; Anderson and Zeuli, 2001; Fausti and Qasmi, 2002; Lusk et al., 2003). This problem is further exacerbated by varying levels of risk aversion among cattle producers (Fausti and Feuz, 1995; Feuz, Fausti, and Wagner, 1995; Fausti, Wang, and Lange, 2013; Fausti et al., 2014).

Continue reading

Cow-calf producers who don't use science when selecting genetics may find their herd on the wrong end of a smoking gun.
By Laura Mushrush      |      
A herd sire packs a powerful punch when it comes to the genetic development of a cow herd. An elementary school science lesson and plain common sense teaches the 50:50 relationship when it comes to the creation of offspring - take that logic to the cow pen, and a bad bull = bad calves.
 
However, with years of brain power invested into research and the development of technology, cattle producers have access to the most advanced genetic selection tools of their time, and those tools are right at their fingertips. Even still, there are producers hesitant to embrace the use of science when it comes to purchasing their next herd bull. According to Larry Keenan, director of breed improvement for the Red Angus Association of America, this resistance is as risky as playing a game of Russian roulette with your genetic program.

"The quality of a bull will be represented in the entire calf crop, because if his genetics are low-quality, then half of his offspring's genetics will be low-quality," Keenan says. "Making matters worse, it has a compounding effect that will stay in herd for generations if replacements are kept." Reason being since you cull bulls more quickly than cows, your bull battery accounts for 75% of your total herd genetics.
 
 

Purpose: To aid in the professional development, success, and experiences of young animal scientists at the regional and national level, by providing support for graduate study. The recipient shall mentor a Masters or PhD student in Animal Science. The recipient mentor and student shall provide a report for publication in both SimTalk and the Register.

The Committee requests that faculty mentors apply for the grant to assist in planning and conducting research, as well as graduate student recruitment and travel. The Committee will award funds to the top two qualifying programs: $5,000 to the top pick and $3,000 to the second choice.

This grant is available to all agriculture disciplines; however, focus will be on the genetic improvement of livestock. Entry Deadline: April 15, with announcement by May 15.

To apply for this award: Faculty members must submit an application explaining the particular area of study and how these funds will be used. The application will include a description of the research, along with supporting documentation from the Department Administration.

This grant will be made payable as a gift to the research account of the selected faculty member. Entry Deadline: April 15

Applications may be submitted electronically or in hard copy to the American Simmental Association One Genetics Way Bozeman, MT 59718 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

SimAngusTM bull to sell at the New Day Genetics Bull Sale in Osceola, MO on April 8th. Click for article

2017 Classic Contests

 

 

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Junior Membership Application                    How to's:       Login to your account            Register an animal

  Registration is closed

   


2017 AJSA NATIONAL CLASSIC

July 9-14, 2017 

Hosted by the Mississippi Simmental Association

Forrest County Multipurpose Center

962 Sullivan Drive Hattiesburg, MS 39401 

Survival Guide

For facility or schedule questions, contact Mississippi Junior Simmental coordinators,
Mark and Debbie Smith, 601-310-6695 or 601-310-6685 or or Deena Branum at 601-310-4440 

For entry or registration questions, contact ASA Youth Director, Emily Lochner at 406-587-4531 ext 517.
Rules        |      Schedule & Information Sheet          |    Facility Map   
      Contest Information:     Study Materials   |   Showmanship   |   Public Speaking   |   Sales Talk   |  Judging 
Interview Contest:  Mock Jobs    Cover Letter Tips      Resume Tips

Hotel Scholarship Application       Trustee Application

Merit Award Scholarship Applications:       Gold      Silver       Bronze

Registration  $75     Cattle entry fee: $45/head     Extra Stalls :  $45     Extra Shirts :  $16
Extra Banquet Ticket: $30

The $75 contestant fee includes all competitive events, official show shirt, and one banquet ticket.
National Classic entries must be submitted online at www.juniorsimmental.org no later than May 22, 2017 at 11:59 PM MT.  

Anyone who waits until the office is closed on the day of the deadline, and has an issue with a membership or animal registration will not be able to enter the show. This year there is no late-entry deadline. 

Event Sponsor

HOST HOTEL

Holiday Inn
10 Gateway Dr
Hattiesburg, MS 39402
601-296-0302 
Block name:  Block is FULL

Candlewood Suites
9 Gateway Dr
Hattiesburg, MS
39402 601-264-9666
Block name: Block is FULL 

 

Hampton Inn

120 Plaza Drive 601-268-0606

Block Name: National Simmental Classic

Home2Suites

116 Plaza Drive 601-261-3800

Block Name: National Simmental Classic

 

CAMPING

$25/night

Michael Turnage

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

 
  North Central Regional Classic


2017 NORTH CENTRAL REGIONAL CLASSIC

 June 28 - July 2, 2017 

Hosted by the South Dakota Simmental Association

South Dakota State Fairgrounds

890 3rd Street SW, Huron, SD 57350 


For fairgrounds or schedule questions, contact South Dakota Junior Simmental Advisors,
Cathy Eichacker at 605-421-1138, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or Kristi Effling 605-769-1308    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

For entry or registration questions, contact ASA Youth Director, Emily Lochner at 406-587-4531 ext 517.
Rules      |      Schedule & Information Sheet           |    Facility Map       

Contest Information:     Study Materials   |   Showmanship   |   Public Speaking   |   Sales Talk   |  Judging 

Registration  $40        Cattle entry fee: $25/head      Extra Shirts  $10    Extra Banquet Ticket: $20

The $40 contestant fee includes all competitive events, official show shirt, and one banquet ticket.
Regional Classic entries must be submitted online at www.juniorsimmental.org no later than May 15, 2017 at 11:59 PM MT.   

Anyone who waits until the office is closed on the day of the deadline, and has an issue with a membership or animal registration will not be able to enter the show. This year there is no late-entry deadline.

 


 

HOST HOTEL

Crossroads 100

4th Street SW

$82/ night

605-352-3204

Block name: NCR Classic - Simmental

HOST HOTEL

Best Western

2000 Dakota Ave

605-352-2000

$85/night

Block name: NCR Classic - Simmental 

HOST HOTEL

Super 8

2189 Dakota Ave

605-352-0740

$77.50/night

Block name: NCR Classic - Simmental  

HOST HOTEL

Quality Inn

100 21st St. NW

605-352-6655

$84/night

Block name: NCR Classic - Simmental

CAMPING

$25/night

800-529-0900 

 

 

     
        


2017 SOUTH CENTRAL REGIONAL CLASSIC

 June 14-17, 2017 

Hosted by the Missouri Simmental Association

Ozark Empire Fairgrounds

3001 N Grant Avenue, Springfield, MO 65803 


For fairgrounds or schedule questions, contact Brittany Gillig at 417-833-2660 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..   
For entry or registration questions, contact ASA Youth Director, Emily Lochner at 406587-4531 ext 517.
Rules      |      Schedule & Information Sheet           |    Facility Map       

Contest Information:     Study Materials   |   Showmanship   |   Public Speaking   |   Sales Talk   |  Judging 

Registration $50       Cattle entry fee:  $35/head      Extra Stall: $35       Extra Shirts:  $13    

Extra Banquet Tickets: $15

The $50 contestant fee includes all competitive events, official show shirt, and one banquet ticket.
Regional Classic entries must be submitted online at www.juniorsimmental.org no later than May 15, 2017 at 11:59 PM MT.   

Anyone who waits until the office is closed on the day of the deadline, and has an issue with a membership or animal registration will not be able to enter the show. This year there is no late-entry deadline.

      

 

HOST HOTEL

Oasis Hotel and Convention Center (formerly Ramada)

2546 N Glenstone Ave. Springfield, MO 417.866.5253 $89/night

Block name: Missouri Junior Simmental Association, cut off date May 13 

CAMPING

30 AMP: $30/night

50 AMP: $35/night First-come first-serve basis only, ample sites are available. 

 

 

 

  Eastern Regional Classic


2017 EASTERN REGIONAL CLASSIC

 June 14-17, 2017 

Hosted by the Ohio Simmental Association

Madison County Fairgrounds

205 Elm Street, London, OH 43140 


For fairgrounds or schedule questions, contact Ohio Junior Simmental Advisor, Jenny Cowdrey at 937-515-0290.   
For entry or registration questions, contact ASA Youth Director, Emily Lochner at 406587-4531 ext 517.
Rules      |      Schedule & Information Sheet           |    Facility Map       

Contest Information:     Study Materials   |   Showmanship   |   Public Speaking   |   Sales Talk   |  Judging 

Registration  $45                Cattle entry fee: $25/head               Extra Shirts  $12    Extra banquet ticket: $15

The $45 contestant fee includes all competitive events, official show shirt, and one banquet ticket.
Regional Classic entries must be submitted online at www.juniorsimmental.org no later than May 15, 2017 at 11:59 PM MT.   

Anyone who waits until the office is closed on the day of the deadline, and has an issue with a membership or animal registration will not be able to enter the show. This year there is no late-entry deadline.

      

 

HOST HOTEL

Fairfield Inn & Suites

5520 Maxwell Place Columbus, Ohio

$119/ night

614-643-4300

19 miles away

Block name: OJSA Cut Off: May 15 

HOST HOTEL

Holiday Inn Columbus

5495 Maxwell Place Columbus, Ohio $124/night

614-335-1150

19 miles away

Block name: OJSA Eastern Regions

Cut Off: May 14 

NEARBY HOTELS

Holiday Inn London

6 miles away

740-852-2700 

 

Hampton Inn West  

19 miles away

614-851-5599 

 

NEARBY HOTELS

Comfort Inn Hilliard

18 miles away

614-870-7658

Country Inn &
Suites

18 Miles away

614-853-1257

CAMPING

$25/night

Bob Richardson

740-852-1654 

 
       


2017 WESTERN REGIONAL CLASSIC

 June 21-24, 2017 

Hosted by the Oregon Simmental Association

Klamath County Fairgrounds

3531 South 6th Street, Klamath Falls, OR 97603 


For fairgrounds or schedule questions, contact Oregon Junior Simmental Advisor, Kristine Rice at 541-870-3726. 
For entry or registration questions, contact ASA Youth Director, Emily Lochner at 406587-4531 ext 517.
Rules      |      Schedule & Information Sheet           |   Facility Map       

Contest Information:     Study Materials   |   Showmanship   |   Public Speaking   |   Sales Talk   |  Judging 

Registration $35.       Cattle entry fee:  $15/head          Extra Stalls: $20          Extra Shirts:  $15    

Extra Banquet Tickets: no cost

The $35 contestant fee includes all competitive events, official show shirt, and one banquet ticket.
Regional Classic entries must be submitted online at www.juniorsimmental.org no later than May 15, 2017 at 11:59 PM MT.   

Anyone who waits until the office is closed on the day of the deadline, and has an issue with a membership or animal registration will not be able to enter the show. This year there is no late-entry deadline.

      

 

HOST HOTEL

Days Inn

3612 South 6th Street Klamath Falls, OR

$79/ night

541-882-8864

Block name: Junior Simmental Regional Cut Off: May 21 

 

 

CAMPING

$25/night

R.V. reservations must be made through OJSA.

Contact Shauna: 530-905-2220

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

      

SPC important dates

Get the 2016/2017 SPC Final Results Here

The AJSA Steer Profitability Competition (SPC) is designed to provide junior members mean­ingful exposure to the opportunities and challenges associated with cattle feeding. The SPC will not only allow participants to measure and compare the profitability of their own animal(s), but of greater importance, it will introduce young beef enthusiasts to peers, mentors, industry advocates, and experiences that are exceedingly difficult to acquire for any beef producer. Participants in the SPC program will be powerful voices as they transition from junior membership to adult participation within the beef industry.

Winners will be announced at the 2018 National Classic Awards Banquet in St. Paul, MN. Awards will be granted for the top three animals overall, top three pen of 3 overall, and top monthly write-up participant.

New This Year

  1. All steers on GrowSafe feed intake system throughout the entire project.
  2. Individual intake and gain information on all steers.
  3. Monthly weights on all steers.
  4. Steers will be fed at University of Missouri Beef Research & Teaching Farm in Columbia, MO.
  5. Risk management and consultation will continue through Chappell Feedlot.
  6. On site field day spring 2018.
  7. A monthly newsletter highlighting SPC details, industry news and steer performance.
  8. One monthly bill detailing specific expenses on each steer.

Animal Requirements:

  1. Steers only
  2. Animals must be entered in the ASA database
  3. One parent registered in the ASA database
  4. DNA sample required
  5. Birth date range: 1/15/17 to 4/15/17
  6. Weaning date range: 8/15/17 to 10/15/17
  7. Castration must occur prior to weaning
  8. Steers must weigh 500 - 750 lbs at delivery
  9. Steers must be polled or dehorned
  10. Any breed composition welcome provided they meet rules 1-9.

 

Contest Guidelines:

  1. Entry fee of $50/ head
  2. Feedlot placement approximately Nov. 1
  3. All decisions at the discretion of feedyard
  4. Harvest will occur approximately May 2018 (Date at discretion of feedyard)
  5. Participation in monthly e-meetings
  6. Entrant will receive reports on:
  7. Monthly feed and health bill
  8. Final feedyard data
  9. Final carcass performance data

 

Testimonials: 

 

“Thank you for putting this program on! I learned a lot, and I am glad I was able to be a part of this.”

– Natalie Bergquist, program participant, ND

 

“Many thanks to the entire staff at the Junior Simmental Association who put forth so much effort  to make this opportunity possible for me and all the other young people who have been involved in this opportunity. Thank you!”

– Madeline Smith, program participant, KY

 

“I just wanted to start my last monthly summary by saying thank you. Thank you for having this awesome program for me to participate in my senior year of high school. I have enjoyed every minute of it, and I am excited to watch this program grow and have hundreds of participants in the upcoming year.”

– Carlye Rodenbeck, program participant, TX

 

“Thanks to you all at AJSA! It’s been a great experience!  Mitchell said to me last night, “now that my last write up is done, I’m gonna miss it!” Kudos to you all!”

– Jen Vaad, program parent, CO

 

“Thank you for all your hard work making this happen and working through all the kinks for us! I thought it  went smoothly for the first year. Thank you again to AJSA, ASA, and Chappell Feedlot for all their help!”

– Brady Wulf, program participant, MN

 

“I have enjoyed the competition and learned so much over the past months.”

– Ella Fischer, program participant, MO

 

Click here for more information

 

Direct questions to ASA Director of Membership and Industry Operations , Chip Kemp at 406-587-4531 ext 508 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 

 Entry Deadline is September 29, 2017
  
  REGISTER
 
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