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Please direct donation inquiries to Linda Kesler at 406-587-4531    Printable Donation Form       Donate Online


 

American Simmental-Simbrah Foundation

Mission Statement

The purpose of the Foundation is to encourage by public or private contribution, support of worthwhile educational and charitable projects that are of interest and benefit to devotees of the American Simmental Association. Further to receive, maintain, use and apply donated funds for such purposes; and to implement such educational and charitable projects, including, but not limited to:

  • Support of ASA's youth program through scholarships or program sponsorship.
  •  Continuing education programs for beef enthusiasts and members of the youth program. 
  • Expanded educational programs for ASA and members of the beef industry in the areas of performance testing, leadership, and bovine management.
  • Research grants to qualified colleges and universities, for documentation of bovine performance, and research into the prevention of, or cure for cattle diseases.
  • Other projects or activities as may be determined by the parent association.

 * * * *

Contributions designated for this endowment will be invested as part of good financial planning to ensure the Foundation will stay strongly committed to its mission and to ensure ASA continues to advance and maintain its leadership in the industry.

Previous donations to the Foundation were invested by the current and past Foundation board members to create this endowment.  The endowment is a permanent, self-sustaining source of funding which allows stability for the future and will provide a steady source of income over time.  The Foundation may commit a percentage of the invested capital each year toward an educational, research or youth program.

 

 

Sponsorship Opportunity

Foundation Wall (picture of branded wood)
“Brand Yourself in Simmental History”; be included in the ASA newly built office building, through a personalized branded wall plaque, or landscape by dedicating a tree outside the building. Several levels of sponsorship exist, with all proceeds going to the Foundation.  You may designate which of the three pillars you wish to support by tagging your donation to a specific project.

 

Specific Objectives

 

Education

Fall Educational Symposium. Each fall the ASA will host an educational session in conjunction with the fall board meeting.  The 2014 session was very successful with nearly 150 attendees.  The day-long event featured genetically oriented talks from nationally recognized experts in livestock genetics and animal breeding.  Seedstock producers, commercial cattlemen, industry personnel, other breed associations, and academics participated in the session and following social.  Join us in hosting the 2015 Educational Session by donating funds for this event. Goal $10,000/year.

Steer Profitability Contest
The AJSA Steer Profitability Competition (SPC) is designed to provide members of the AJSA meaningful exposure to the opportunities and challenges associated with cattle feeding. The SPC will not only allow participants to measure and compare the profitability of their own animal(s), but of greater importance, will introduce young beef enthusiasts to peers, mentors, industry advocates, and experiences that are exceedingly difficult to acquire for any beef producer.  

 

Research

Feed Intake Project.
The cost of feed is the number one cost to the beef industry annually (65% of the production cost of beef). The ability to predict differences in feedlot intake of sires’ offspring is an important component in the assessment of differences in profitability between sires. The Feed Intake Project collects individual feed intake data on calves of known sire groups to improve our ability to predict feed intake and thus improve our ability to predict differences in profit. Goal $30,000/year.

Walton-Berry Graduate Student Support Grant Walton-Berry Graduate Student Support Grant supports graduate education with an emphasis on genetic improvement of livestock. The fund originally started by Jim Berry of Wildberry Farms honors Dr. Bob Walton’s lifelong efforts in animal breeding and raising Simmental cattle. Walton-Berry Graduate Student Support Grant funds graduate education in research programs to directly improve applied livestock genetics and help build future experts in animal breeding. There are two awards - one for $5,000 and a second for $3,000 for graduate education programs; each recipient contributes to ASA Publication regarding their research both SimTalk and the Register.  Click here for detailed information.

Youth

AJSA Canadian Exchange Project. Each summer, two AJSA Board of Trustee members will be randomly selected to attend the Young Canadian Simmental Association National Classic. This is more than just an opportunity to travel, but rather an opportunity for AJSA members to learn about international agriculture, new ideas to progress the association, and gain new friends in an attempt to build their resume and personal experience.

National Classic Facility Support. Together as one team, our junior programs will flourish! The Eastern and Western Regions have each formed state groups to fundraise for their yearly Regional Classics. The Eastern Regional group hosts a fundraiser at the NAILE each year, allowing states in the east to step up more freely to host classics, due to a lower financial cost. Following suit of a previously successful regional group, the Western Region formed their own group. The key is to see states within a specific region as one unit, rather than individuals. The establishment of these regional groups is
to raise funds for the Eastern and Western Regional Classics, despite which state holds the classic.


Merit Awards.
Dollars for scholars. Established in 1981, the Merit Award is designed to provide recognition to junior members who have made “significant contributions to their community, home, family, school, and the Simmental or Simbrah breeds of cattle.” As college tuition continues to increase, the Foundation continues to support 16 AJSA members each year by awarding over $26,250 in scholarships, 11 Silver Merit Awards and 5 Gold Merit Awards, to help them continue their collegiate educational endeavors.  Click here


Eastern and Western Regional Classics.
Together as one team, our junior programs will flourish! The Eastern and Western Regions have each formed state groups to fundraise for their yearly Regional Classics. The Eastern Regional group hosts a fundraiser at the NAILE each year, allowing states in the east to step up more freely to
host classics, due to a lower financial cost. Following suit of a previously successful regional group, the Western Region formed their own group. The key is to see states within a specific region as one unit, rather than individuals. The establishment of these regional groups is to raise funds for the Eastern and Western Regional Classics, despite which state holds the classic.

 

The Eileen DuJardin Memorial AJSA National Classic Scholarship has been established through the American Simmental-Simbrah Foundation. Funds from this scholarship will help sponsor an AJSA member to attend the National Classic each year. Donations can be made via check sent to One Genetics Way, Bozeman, MT 59718, or via credit card by calling 406.587-4531.  Read about Eileen here.

 Please direct donation inquiries to Linda Kesler  406-587-4531

American Simmental~Simbrah Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

 

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Member Spotlight

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Member Spotlight

Stuck on SimAngusTM

A Montana commercial operation transitions to producing high performance SimAngusTM seedstock bulls.

By Emme Troendle

“SimAngus, Simmental and Angus breeds have always been the top of our list because of the quality of the breeds,” commends Will Townsend of Townsend Ranch LLC, “We have used traces of other breeds in the past, but when it came down to it, the trends weren’t as good as Simmental, Angus, and SimAngus.”

The Townsend Ranch, located outside of White Sulphur Springs, Montana, is situated with the rugged Big Belt Mountain Range and famous Smith River as a backdrop to their productive ranch and farmland. Townsend continues, “If you look at the $API (All Purpose Index) and $TI (Terminal Index) trends for SimAngus cattle, they have increased continuously, but that isn’t the case for all breeds.”

Townsend is the third generation to ranch in White Sulfur Springs, where they run a 1,500 head operation that is in the midst of changing from a commercial cow-calf pair to seedstock bull production. “We have been improving genetics for a long-time, so we got the idea to market and sell some of our bulls, and now we’re looking to move full-time into the seedstock business,” he elaborates.

Read more

Parker Cattle Company

Success in Details
parker6

A Parker Cattle Company cow on a snowy Colorado day.

 

A family-run Colorado Simmental operation achieves quick progress through carefully made genetic decisions and a focus on quality over quantity.  Seven years typically isn’t enough time to build a respected seedstock operation. It takes 18 months to see whether or not a chosen cross was the right choice; years to know if customers are happy with their bulls; even longer to simply build a good reputation, even if cattle are performing alongside competitors. For Reed Parker and his father Brett, genetics have allowed them to build a respected operation worthy of taking note in this short period of time.

The ranch runs on around 2,000 acres of country representative of the dry but productive plains of eastern Colorado. The Parker family has been in the Stratton area for years, starting with a diversified cattle and farming operation. Years later when Brett took a job as an ABS representative, cattle came to the forefront. Add to this Reed’s preference for cattle, and they chose to relocate to a nearby area better suited for cattle production and begin their pursuit of raising top-quality Simmental breeding stock.

Read more

Great Basin Simmental

Anderson Family

Simmental genetics have a significant impact on the commercial breeding program of a remote, isolated Utah operation. 

By Dan Rieder

Founded in 1886, the Willow Springs Ranch has been in the same family ever since. Situated in the arid and often harsh environment of far western Utah, the ranch is currently owned and operated by Don and Beth Anderson. Beth is the fifth generation to live and work on her family’s ranch, previously named the Bagley Ranch. The ranch is located near the small town (population, including ranchers: 35) of Callao (pronounced Cal-lay-oh), just a few miles from the Nevada State line. The nearest paved road is more than 35 miles away. It is 90 miles southeast to Delta, and 80 miles north to Wendover, Nevada. It’s also just south of the famed US Army Dugway Proving Ground and the Great Salt Lake Desert.    “We’re at 4,300 feet elevation, but don’t usually get a lot of snow or severe cold,” Don said. “Because we’re on the high desert, which is part of the Great Basin, our forage doesn’t have the same qualities of the higher mountain grasses of some other regions of the West. We don’t get quite the weaning weights that other ranchers often report. If our steer calves top 520 pounds at six months of age, we’re generally satisfied.”   

Read more

Blended Family, Blended Cattle

A South Dakota couple has successfully combined their children and their cattle.
By Dan Rieder

When Jane and Jim Green of Clark, South Dakota, married back in 1982, they were establishing a family that would remarkably mirror the eventual development of their two-breed cowherd.  “We are a blended family. I had been divorced and had two girls: Anne Jo, 14, and Amy, who was 10. Jim had lost his first wife in childbirth, and had a daughter, Vicki, also 10, and a son, Brian, 8,” Jane volunteered. “I had a herd of 25 registered Angus cows and told Jim that I wasn’t going to marry him unless I could bring my cows along,” she laughed.
Jim had concentrated on commercial cattle before their marriage. “I had a little bit of everything before turning to Simmental. I had real good luck with them and have really enjoyed the breed. I’d added a few registered Simmental cows to my herd and Jane convinced me that I should join the Association and get the papers on those cattle. I signed up the same year we got married,” he explained.  Jim was raised on a family farm, located right next door to their present farm, and has been in agriculture for his entire life, except for a two-year hitch in the US Army and a brief period when he worked in road construction.    Read more

The Traveling Man

A multi-tasking breeder covers much of south Texas as the family cowherd grows and improves.
by Dan Rieder

Managing three widely separated cattle ranches requires considerable travel and long hours. Throw in a flourishing vegetable brokerage enterprise and you wonder when Pete Nieshwietz (pronounced Nesh-witz), Jr., finds the time to eat and sleep.  The original 7N family ranch is located near Falls City (population:  593) located just southeast of San Antonio. That’s where Pete, Sr. and Marilyn live and keep an eye on 75 head, a portion of the family’s mixed cowherd. Incidentally, 7N was chosen as the ranch name to include the parents and their brood of five children.  In 2011, a place at Donna (population: 16,771), 210 miles to the south in the Rio Grande Valley, was added. Pete, Jr. lives there, along with 100 head. More recently, in 2014, a place at El Sauz (population: 50), 75 miles west of Donna, was added.  The remainder of their 300-head cowherd is maintained at the El Sauz location.

“I have brothers and sisters and some nephews that have a few cows, but for the most part, our operation consists of my folks and myself,” Pete, Jr. explained. “Our current cowherd
includes 150 head of registered Simbrah females plus 25 registered Simmentals and 25 registered Brahman. In addition, we keep about 100 Simbrah-influenced commercial cows, which make ideal embryo transfer recips.”  Nieschwietz points out that the environment of their three ranches varies considerably. “Here at Donna, the land is flat and flood-irrigated, allowing us to run up to three cows to the acre. Over at El Sauz, it is primarily rocky and arid grazing land, and the home place at Falls City is rolling hills and river bottom. It takes between 10 and 15 acres per cow at those two places,” he continued.

Read more

A Preference for Simmental

“In the early 1990s, my wife, Allison, and I moved to Summit, a small town in Southern Utah where her father, Carlisle Hulet, needed some help running his cowherd and a band of 4,000 ewes,” says Chris Beins (rhymes with fines). “We had lived in Texas and built a small herd of Santa Gertrudis cows. Before we left Texas, we sold those cows to a good friend.”  Beins admits that he was not cut out to be what he calls a sheep guy. “So, while we were living there, we built up a commercial Hereford/Limousin-cross cow herd, got up to more than 200 head at one time, and began using Simmental bulls on them. We bred those cows to sons of Black Mick and Black Irish Kansas and some others, and really liked their calves — they had such great performance and we found that the resulting females milked so much better than the cows that formed our base herd,” he recalled.  “The docility of the Simmental just stood out. All the way around, we just liked them,” he added.  During their eight-year stay at Summit, they started a family, and Beins completed an undergraduate degree at Southern Utah University, at nearby Cedar City.  “In 1999, we decided that I should go to Law School, sold all the cattle and enrolled at Western State University of Law located in Fullerton, California,” he said.  After graduating and passing the bar in 2002, Beins and his family settled near Tremonton in northern Utah, just south of the Idaho state line. He was raised in nearby Soda Springs, Idaho, where his folks, Duane and Diane, ran a farm supply store and an oil distributorship, and is only an hour-and-a-half drive from their current location.  “After establishing my law practice in Tremonton, we ventured back into the cattle business,” he reports. “We remembered those Simmental-cross cattle that we liked so well and knew that’s what we wanted to raise. We weren’t sure that we were going to become registered breeders or anything like that at the time. We bought two Simmental cows from Carl and Diane Bott from down at Castledale, began to build on those first purchases and just kept buying registered cattle, even some from as far away as Georgia, Missouri and Kentucky.”

Read more

A Legacy of Crossbreeding

By Dan Rieder
The Buell family, left to right: Chad, Tricia, Carter, Julian, Brooklyn, Ireland, and grandparents
Darla and Homer.

“We’ve had a longtime tradition of crossbreeding dating back a couple of generations,” says Chad Buell (rhymes with mule) of the Shovel Dot ranch, located on the eastern edge of Nebraska’s famed grass-rich Sandhills.  “That started well before I was born — my grandfather, dad and uncle had a base herd of registered and commercial Herefords, mixed in some other breeds and even bred our heifers to Longhorns. They added Angus in the early 1980s and really liked what they got from those baldy cows,” he continued. “They’d attended various university extension events over the years, understood the value of crossbreeding and all the advantages gained from hybrid vigor. Our cattle were almost all English origin at that time.”  In 2002, Chad’s dad, Homer, and his uncle Larry, who had been running the ranch together, began to think about retirement. “Both of them were in their late 50s and they decided to split the place and let the next generation take on the responsibilities,” Chad reported. “Uncle Larry turned his half over to his daughter, Devon Nelson, and her husband, Kelby, and they have now switched to straightbred Angus.  ‘Dad and I came to the conclusion that we wanted to incorporate composite bulls into our share of the herd. We figured that we’d not only increase hybrid vigor, but it would make pasture management easier than a two-breed rotation,” he says. “As a result, we had more live calves weaned per cow exposed.”  Buell recalls that they had discussed using SimAngus™ bulls for a number of years, but didn’t make the ultimate move until 2009, when they purchased several halfblood bulls.

“Initially, we chose halfblood bulls to use on our Angus/Hereford baldy cows, aiming at producing quarter-blood females. Now, we’ve started buying quarter-blood bulls because we have quite a few quarter-blood females in the herd and think that’s a level we want to maintain,” he explained.  “Our longterm goal is to establish a completely crossbred cowherd, a process that is still in progress because the first replacement females out of those halfblood bulls were born in 2010 and are still among our youngest cows,” he says. “Also, we’ve still got quite a few baldy cows in our herd.  Hopefully, in another five years, we’ll have a herd of one-quarter Simmental females, with the other three-fourths from British genetics, a combination that fits our low-input production system.”  Buell has purchased his SimAngus bulls from a wide range of prominent area breeders, including John Christensen, Wessington Springs, South Dakota; Loren Berger, Stapleton, Nebraska; Dick Helms of Flying H Genetics, Arapahoe, Nebraska; and Darby Line of Triangle J Ranch, Miller, Nebraska.

Read more

A Country Boy Operation: Harper's Cattle

By Dan Rieder
A modest, self-effacing breeder has quietly, but quickly built the largest Simmental herd in Louisiana.

When the American Simmental Association recently published its annual “Leading Breeders by State list” the name of Donnie Harper sat perched at the top of the ledger. In just a few short years, the northeastern Louisiana producer had leapfrogged to an enviable position among the area’s Simmental cattlemen.

“I was raised on this farm by my parents, James and Shirley, who have passed on. My folks were mostly cotton and soybean row crop farmers, although they always had a few Polled Herefords around. As a kid, Herefords were the only cattle I knew. I was raised with my older brother, Jimmy. Jimmy still lives here on the farm, but makes his living off the farm, as a Baptist preacher and a deputy sheriff,” he explained. “Our original farm was partly inherited by my mother and partly purchased by my Daddy.”

The farm is situated near the tiny town of Crowville, but their mail is delivered through the post office located in Winnsboro (population: 4,800). The nearest larger town is Monroe, 50 miles to the northwest, where his daughter and son-in-law, Sharon and Dustin Baugh reside. Sharon and Dustin are parents of Donnie’s two grandsons, Harper, 8, and Dustin, 7.

Read more

Partners in Performance: Barker Cattle Company

By Dan Rieder

A closely knit, three-way partnership pays dividends for an innovative Idaho outfit.

Barker Cattle Company, located near the small town of Elba in southeastern Idaho, is an LLC (Limited Liability Company) comprised of three partner families.  The patriarch and primary spokesman for the operation is Ruel Barker, 78, who spent 35 years as a Brigham Young University (BYU) Professor after acquiring his Ph.D. in Physical Education and Exercise Science. Since retirement, Barker and his wife, Kay, continue to maintain their principal residence in Provo, Utah, home of BYU.

The second partner is Tyler Barker, Ruel and Kay’s only son, who is employed as a regional manager for Zoetis Pharmaceuticals (formerly Pfizer Animal Health) and also lives in Provo with his wife, Amanda, and their children. Tyler’s involvement with the ranch focuses on herd health and marketing aspects. The day-to-day operation of the ranch is under the watchful eyes of Tom and Sally Ottley and their family. “Tom grew up across the street from the family ranch in Elba and one day about 25 years ago after completing the Ranch Management course at BYU-Idaho in Rexburg, he told me that he’d like to work for me on my ranch,” Ruel says. “The rest is history. Tom and Sally are our working partners and their son, Braden, also works on the ranch.”

Read more

An Exciting Ride: Missouri Century Farm

By Dan Rieder

An optimistic Missouri breeder embraces the science of cattle breeding reinforced by a zest for the good life.

The first impression one observes during a conversation with Ernest Flucke (pronounced “flew-key”) is his unbridled enthusiasm for beef cattle production and especially Simmental, his breed of choice. “I have enjoyed an unbelievable, exciting ride with Simmental ever since I started with the breed, and cooperating on this story is just one more item on the pile of really great things that have happened to me,” he volunteered. “I have a good wife, good land, good cattle and had a good Border Collie dog until he died,” he continued. “I definitely have a good life.” Flucke grew up on the farm where he lives with his wife, Maxine. The farm has been in his family continuously for 110 years.

 Read more

Performance Advocate Program

"Performance Advocate Scores" are displayed for THE herds on ASA web site. From Herdbook Services, select "Data Entry" Select "Online"; the inventory web page now displays a "Performance Advocate Score" along with the amount of data reported relative to the data expected to be reported. The score and counts are display for the calf crop (year-season) you designate. To be designated as a "Performance Advocate", a score of 500 or more is needed.

To get a list of all data you reported on each calf for specific year and season, select "Reports" from the "Herd Mgmt" tab. On the "Reports" web page (under the "Herd Mgmt" tab) change the "Existing Group" option to "Inventory", enter the year and season, choose the "Performance Advocate" report and select "Generate Report" button. Use this feature to see what information has and has not been reported for each calf.

A list of "Performance Advocate" breeders from THE-enrolled herds is determined June 1, based on data from fall of the previous year and spring of the current year THE enrolled herds.

 

 Click for list of Performance Advocates and scores

 

ASA Performance Advocate

The phrase “we’re all in this together” is certainly on the mark when it comes to our genetic evaluation program. Though a top-tier genetic evaluation system requires an engine built on cutting edge technology, that engine will not get us anywhere without fuel — the fuel being data. No matter how high tech the system used to calculate EPDs, achieving high levels of accuracy requires data — lots of data.

To encourage more thorough reporting of performance data, ASA has implemented the Performance Advocate Program.  Any breeder who meets its requirements are listed annually in the late fall SimTalk and on our website as a Performance Advocate — a designation that should carry weight in the industry. The achievement conveys to potential customers that you are serious about performance testing.  

  • Only members enrolled in THE are eligible for the Performance Advocate designation.
  • A breeder must submit the following records on 100% of the calves in their herd:
    • Calving ease scores
    • Birth weights
    • Weaning weights
    • Yearling weights
    • Yearling hip heights
    • Ultrasound or carcass measurements

To comply with the program, a breeder is required to submit calving ease scores and calf birth weights for every cow on inventory that calved during that year (whether its calf was dead or alive). From calving on, breeders need to be vigilant about using Calf Removal Codes to achieve Performance Advocate status. If no calf record exists because they have been removed from the herd, the only way to reach 100% compliance is by applying a calf removal code for those which were not in your herd at the time of data recording.

Your level of compliance with the program can be monitored by logging into your account on our website. There you will find graphs indicating the proportion of your calves that have data recorded for each trait listed above. Hopefully, the capacity to easily monitor data submission and public acknowledgement for 100% compliance will increase data flow to the ASA.

 

Following are testimonials from several breeders who

have been actively pursuing

Performance Advocate status for their herds.

After seven years, ASA’s Performance Advocate (PA) program, which recognizes those breeders who consistently submit perfor mance data on six different traits, continues to expand. In the first year, a single breeder reached a perfect score of 600. During the second year, perfect scores expanded to eight breeders, to 13 breeders after three years, 19 after four years, 23 after five years. The current listing shows 29 per fect scores.
In addition, 64 other breeders recorded scores between 500 and 599. The six traits, for which all data must be reported, are: calving ease, birth
weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, yearling hip height and ultrasound. The maximum score for each of the six traits is 100, with the PA score calculated as the sum of the scores for each trait.  PA scores listed in this issue are for the Fall, 2013 and Spring, 2014 calf crops.

 

Clear Springs Cattle Company, Starbuck, MN

The Wulf family at Clear Springs Cattle Company is relatively new to the Simmental business but are no strangers to the cattle industry and data collection. “When Clear Springs started our herd, Tom Hook of Hook Farms, Tracy, MN, was an obvious resource because of his long history of integrity and his great mind and eye for cattle,” said Travis Wulf. “After all, the Hooks have been raising performance-tested Simmental cattle for 43 years. After communicating, it was decided we would work together to better utilize resources and create larger contemporaries.” For the past four years the majority of the Hook cows have been at Clear Springs in Starbuck and Tom Hook has grown the bulls and hosted the sale in Tracy. Beginning this year, the bulls will be performance-tested in the new monoslope facility and the sale will be held at Clear Springs. All heifers will be developed and bred at Hook’s. The Hook and Wulf families have the same philosophies in many aspects of life and breeding cattle. Both operations are not only family-owned but also family-operated. “We strive to be as productive as possible while still being good stewards of the land and cattle. Our commitment and belief in the ‘Bred for Balance’ brand guides the approach we take to produce cattle we believe will move the beef industry forward,” Wulf concluded. “Bred for Balance” 2017 will be held February 10, 2017, at the ranch in Starbuck with approximately 90 bulls and 30 females that have all been weighed, ultrasounded, docility-scored and have genomically-enhanced EPDs, in the offering.


 

T&T Cattle, LLC, Riverton, WY

T & T Cattle is a partnership involving brothers Bobby and Brendan Thoman, a seedstock and grass fed beef operation with 100 cows and growing. Their operation specializes in low-input genetics that can do it all on grass. Profitability is a main focus and natural selection is key component. The cattle have to be low maintenance and efficient converters of grass, or they fall out of the program. In the search for efficiency and profitability, the value of the crossbred cow cannot be ignored

Balance in all traits is sought and extremes are avoided. SimAngus cattle have provided this balance and have proven very complimentary, even in successive generations when hybrid vigor wanes. Data collection is imperative to evaluate and score the cattle. ASA’s Total Herd Enrollment (THE) and Performance
Advocate programs encourage data collection on all cattle. This provides a more accurate representation of a cow’s genetic merit, and analysis of this data makes it easy to identify and remove under-performing cattle. This is a valuable tool in the toolbox of selecting and retaining superior cattle.


 

Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA

 Our purebred herd of Simmental cattle was introduced in 2009 into the Beef Teaching Program in the Department of Animal and Poultry Sciences at Virginia Tech and currently includes 28 breeding-age females. This valuable breed, along with three other purebred breeds of cattle, provides our 600+ undergraduate majors with meaningful, real-life opportunities and situations in an experiential learning environment. Our commercial herd of 200 cows is heavily influenced by the Simmental breed where calves annually exhibit great uniformity and tremendous hybrid vigor, both pre- and post-weaning. Students are able to witness first-hand the excellent mothering ability from both the purebred female and the Simmental-influenced crossbred cow.      In our selection process with the Simmental herd, we put heavy emphasis on homozygous polled genetics, homozygous black coat color, and high performance cattle with proven genetics.  Embryo transfer and artificial insemination are consistently utilized to improve the genetics of our Simmental herd. All yearling cattle are ultra sounded to collect much-needed carcass data.  The Total Herd Enrollment (THE) has allowed us to compile extensive data on individual animals to make accurate selection/culling decisions and provides us with on-line data basing and herd management services.    VT Simmental cattle are in great demand and are routinely consigned and sold through state-sponsored and national consignment sales. We take full advantage of all the performance records, HD50K testing on all sale bulls, and ultrasound measurements that are generated through the Performance Advocate Program to not only provide reliable data to our customers but also to educate our undergraduate students. 


McDonald Farm, Blacksburg, VA

 McDonald Farms is an eighth generation diversified livestock farm that originated in 1763. When the first McDonalds came to the New World they wanted to build a better life for themselves and the rest of their fellow man. So it continues today. Our goal is to provide a good living for ourselves and a quality genetic product for our Customers. The former is dependent on the latter, so is the latter dependent on sound genetic evaluation. Our cowherd is made up of roughly 200 calving cows and heifers which consists of 50 PB Simmental, 50 PB Angus (dual registered with ASA and AAA) and 100 SimAngus™. The farm is located in the Tom’s Creek Basin near Blacksburg, Virginia. It is much like most of Southwest Virginia as it is good grass country. Grass is what we have to sell and we do that through the livestock we raise.

We work hard at collecting all the data for the Performance Advocate program as we feel that this information is critical to accurate genetic evaluation of our cattle. The proper grouping of contemporaries, collection of weights and ultrasound data of our bulls and heifers allows us to make informed decisions on which animals are worthy of contributing their genetics to the next generation.


The use of DNA evaluation is increasing as well, but we will always need to collect phenotypes to better understand the genotypes. It is a very exciting time to be in the cattle business and especially in Simmental as the demand for our performance genetics is growing more all the time. The future looks bright for those willing to provide quality genetics backed up by quality performance data.


 

Rydeen Farms, Clearbrook, MN

In 1897, Rydeen Farms began as 160 acres in northern Minnesota. Edward D. Rydeen from Winthrop, MN homesteaded the land at the age of 21, when President Grover Cleveland signed the Minnesota Homestead Act. As time passed, their dairy herd was replaced by a beef herd. The Simmental herd started expanding in the 1970s and breeding livestock was marketed in 1979. Today, Rydeen Farms is owned and operated by the Paul and Lois Rydeen family. In addition to cattle, the farm now includes corn, soybeans, wheat and forage for the livestock, which is produced over 2,500 acres of owned/rented land. Approximately 275 red and black cows make up the herd with the majority of cows calving in March and April. A fall calving herd was developed based on customer requests for aged bulls. Rydeen Farms is committed to the needs of commercial cattle men and women and seeks to provide bulls and females that help their customers succeed as they work to improve their product for the beef industry. There is an emphasis on the use of data and phenotype to improve the herd. The farm hosts an annual production sale, known as the “Vision Sale”, which is in its 19th year. The sale is held on the second Sunday in February, and markets yearling bulls, 18-month-old bulls and bred heifers. 


Homefront Cattle Company, Utica, MN

Homefront Cattle Company is a family run operation located in the beautiful driftless area of southeast Minnesota, about 35 miles southeast of Rochester, MN. Homefront Cattle is owned and operated by Randy and Karolyn Boyum and their children John (Megan), Joe (Carrie and Bristol) and Jessica. Along with the cattle, the Boyum’s run 900 acres of cropland raising corn, soybeans and alfalfa. Homefront Cattle was established in 2008 with the purchase of their first Simmental cow, that started the transition from their dairy operation which ended in 2003. Within only a sort time their cow/calf operation had grown to over 160 pairs with roughly 60 of them being registered as purebred or percentage. The Boyum’s are a big believer in cow families and strives to improve their herd by using their top genetics. They do this by artificial inseminating most of their registered cows and using embryo transfer on their top proven cows. Along with using powerful cow families, Homefront Cattle is also very diligent about collect accurate data to help them make the next best decision to help improve their overall herd performance. Homefront Cattle keeps about 30 replacement heifers a year and markets around 10-15 bulls a year mostly through private treaty and consignment sales and markets the rest as feeder calves in early January.
 


 

Craig Hays, Maryville, MO

Craig and Becky Hays run about 125 Simmental and SimAngus™ cows in Maryville, Missouri. Replacement heifers are kept, the top end of bulls are marketed as seedstock, and the remainder of the calves are fed through a feedlot in order to collect carcass data. Many of their bull customers retain ownership on Hays Land and Cattle sired calves, so selection on performance and carcass is a must. In addition to the Performance Advocate traits, the Hays family also collects mature weights, hip heights, body condition scores, and rump fats on the cows. Collecting performance data has been a longstanding practice for the Hays family. Craig is among the first of ultrasound technicians to be certified to collect carcass ultrasound data. Becky runs UltraInsights Processing Lab, one of the three certified centralized ultrasound processing labs. In 2008, Craig and Becky built a 300-head feed efficiency testing center and later sold it to Becky’s family. All Hays yearling bulls and heifers continue to be evaluated for individual dry matter intake. Currently, the Hays cowherd is involved in two university research projects. The Hays children also participate in the dayto-day operations, along with the help of Craig’s father, Curt. Lindsay, 14, helps with calving and runs the chute during processing time, Jessica, 12, has a knack with paperwork, and Cody, 10, is Craig’s choice when it comes to sorting and pushing cattle. All enjoy the ultrasound aspects of the business. Craig and Becky feel blessed to be a part of such a family friendly industry and appreciate working with so many forward thinking fellow producers.


Circle M Cattle Company, Burlington, NC

 Circle M Cattle Company was first established in 2000 by Jonathan Massey at Burlington, NC. Massey Farms was founded in 1972 by Johnny Massey, Jonathan’ s father.  Today Circle M is owned and operated by Jonathan, his wife, Melissa, and family.     Through the years many changes have come about to adapt to the ever changing cattle industry. The days of the purebred red Simmentals have given way to black SimAngus™ cattle as well as black Simmentals. Circle M Cattle now partners with Massey Farms to have their own combined bull and replacement female sale, keeping in all in the family. We are proud to announce that 2016 will be our Eighth Annual SimAngus Solution Sale that the Masseys hold annually on the farm the third Saturday in November. The bulls and females that are marketed each year are developed in a real world setting to allow them to perform once they are sold. The Massey family collects all available data on each animal born from birth to yearling. DNA testing is utilized for coat color and polled traits in the event it is unknown. Carcass data is collected on each bull that is sold in the annual sale. The Massey’s market around thirty bulls and twenty females annually to commercial cattlemen across the state of North Carolina, as well as Virginia, and South Carolina. As we go forward, we have three goals in mind. The first goal is to produce the highest quality bulls and heifers. The second goal is to provide the best quality customer service to our loyal customers who come back every year to purchase our breed stock through the year, just not on sale day. The third goal is to continue to be in the cutting edge of education and information on the everchanging field of genetics as it relates to the cattle industry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Progress Through Performance

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Articles

PTP Contributes to Our Success-Part One (Four-part series) Contributers: Steve Reimer, Curt Rincker, Marty Ropp, and Jerry Lipsey

 Obviously, exhibiting SimGenetics is important to our membership. Shows provide opportunities for ASA members to meet potential customers, review cattle produced by others, get unbiased evaluations from notable judges, and enter into conversations of sire selection and production ideas. On the other hand, each year, hundreds of ASA members who hardly own a rope halter, let alone have the inclination or ability to ready cattle for either a national show or their county fair, sell huge numbers of bulls and heifers. How does our Association blend and service two significantly different businesses?         Read more

 


 

PTP Contributes to Our Success-Part Two (Four-part series) Contributers: Steve Reimer, Curt Rincker, Marty Ropp, and Jerry Lipsey

Evaluating and Emphasizing Muscle and Fat in Shows. This is an ongoing discussion of the possibilities of show ring selections impacting the beef industry popularity of SimGenetics. There is widespread consensus that selection for show winners decades ago had long lasting, near disastrous impacts on Simmental and Simbrah beef industry demand. Consequently, leaders of the American Simmental Association established PTP Shows in an effort to provide judges and audiences with information crucial to SimGenetic seedstock marketing success. Since the first PTP Shows of the early 1990s, comments by both spectators and exhibitors always include, “the judge spent all day with his head buried in the paper,” to “those judges paid no attention to the numbers.” We doubt if the controversy will ever end; however, there seems to be less debate in recent years that soundness, size, and composition (the conformation of exhibited cattle) are now days, more industry friendly. Part I focused on skeletal soundness.        Read more

 


 

PTP Contributes to Our Success-Part Three (Four-part series) Growth and Frame Contributers: Steve Reimer, Curt Rincker, Marty Ropp, and Jerry Lipsey

 

In two previous articles, we discussed PTP Show evaluations of skeletal soundness and body composition, specifically, fat and muscle. The purpose of these articles is to assess the potential of PTP Show judge selection of having an impact on SimGenetic genetic change. Obviously, judges’ selections at shows have had influence on both the reality and perception of breed types. Many decades ago, show ring winners were compact, fat, seemingly, slow growing cattle. By the time Simmental and other Continental breeds were available in the U.S., show winner selection had taken a 180-degree turn, and in the 1980s, purple ribbons adorned huge framed, lean cattle that offered birth weight, cow size and marbling challenges. Today, our PTP Show winners are typically 5 and 6 framed, more muscular and heavier conditioned (more external fat) than cattle exhibited 20 years ago. In Part I, we generally agreed that skeletal soundness is reasonably evaluated by visual assessment of conformation. However, attaching show ring soundness differences to reproduction or production traits is difficult because we do not database soundness scores like weaning weights or ultrasound data. Our common sense tells us that better soundness is related to better animal performance, but there is no doubt, animal performance (growth, stay and carcass) is better related to the EPDs than any normal visual signals we have.                Read more

 


 

PTP Contributes to Our Success-Part Four (Four-part series) Balance and Beauty Contributers: Steve Reimer, Curt Rincker, Marty Ropp, and Jerry Lipsey

 

We have discussed the challenges of judging, Selecting, buying or selling cattle with less than attractive soundness, muscling, leanness, and size. Most of our ideas and comments are not very controversial; however, this time, we suspect the topics of balance and beauty can put some cattle producers on edge. From a science standpoint relating to the entire beef industry, it’s not particularly difficult to define economically relevant traits (ERTs). These are traits that directly impact either values or costs to cow herds, feedyards or packers. ASA’s economic indexes use every EPD we have as either a direct ERT or an ERT indicator. Economic indexes are developed to work nearly perfectly; however, our world and our industry are not perfect. We know colors and shapes can impact cattle worth even though it is difficult, perhaps impossible, to relate these to reproduction, growth and meat production values. Of course, the EPDs and economic indexes we provide judges and audiences have no reference to color, shape, balance or beauty. However, producers who show cattle must display entries with significant symmetry and balance in order to get noticed, and hopefully, rewarded. But, there are several physical features associated with showing cattle that have very little impact on commercial cowherds, feedyards and packers, but for decades, beauty and balance (human values) have had significant effects on show ring successes. Without doubt, years of selection for these conformation conditions have influenced seedstock customer demand, and the importance of these often confuse beef producers.        Read more

 

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Total Herd Enrollment Requirements

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THE It's as Easy as 1,2,3 -video

Total Herd Enrollment (THE) is a cow inventory-based program. Participation in the program requires an inventory of all your Simmental registered cows that is updated yearly.

ENROLLMENT DEADLINES

Spring Herds

Herds (dams that will calve between Jan 1 – June 30)

*Enrollment Time: Oct 15 – Dec 15 prior to calving season.  To meet the compliance deadline for calf data reporting, all calf data needs to be submitted to ASA by the following December 15.

 

Fall Herds

Herds (dams that will calve between July 1 - Dec 31)

*Enrollment Time: Apr 15 - June 15 prior to calving season

To meet the compliance deadline for calf data reporting, all calf data needs to be submitted to ASA by the following June 15.

Late Enrollment

If you miss the THE enrollment deadline and were enrolled the prior year:

Members enrolled in THE that miss the enrollment deadline will have all of the dams listed on the preliminary inventory generated by ASA enrolled in Option A at $16.00 each.  Members will then have 30 days (February 1 for Spring herds, August 1 for Fall herds) to make adjustments to their inventory (the same way as enrolling) including a choice to change from Option A to Option B or C. (THE fees will be adjusted if you change to Option B or C within the 30 days).

Note:  If adjustments are not made within 30 days (February 1 or August 1), your preliminary inventory will be accepted as is (including enrolled in Option A, regardless of previous year’s option). There is a $1.00 late-enrollment fee that will not be refunded.

Highlights:

  • All Simmental or Simbrah registered cows must be enrolled in SAME option
  •  Commercial cows and cows of other breeds can be enrolled in either option
  • Members can have all ASA registered cows in TR and non-ASA registered cows in SR
  • Enrolling a cow in THE does NOT register the cow with ASA

For more information please see the Have You Herd blog, http://www.simmental.org/haveyouherd.

 

 

Benefits of THE

 

Goals of THE

 
  • Improve Quality of Data Submitted and Used by ASA in Genetic Evaluations — Submitting data on the entire cowherd provides the complete contemporary group, which leads to more informative EPDs and adjusted measurements.  Submitting only a portion of the cowherd causes the contemporary group to be biased, ultimately leading to misinformative EPDs. 
  • Improve and Develop Female Records — A reproductive record on every cow, every year aids in the improvement and development of female-oriented EPDs, such as Stayability and Heifer Pregnancy.  It will also enable an accurate calving interval to be calculated. 
  • National Animal Identification Program — Enrolling in THE will provide every animal with a unique number and allow for continuous data to be reported to that number each year.
  • Reduced or No Registration Fees — Registration fees for members enrolled in THE will be less or they may even be free depending on the enrollment option. 
  • More Informative EPDs Returned — Performance-based EPDs will be provided to members enrolled in THE on any animal registered, which means the animal’s own weights and the contemporary group will go into the calculation of its EPDs.  Members not enrolled in THE will only receive pedigree estimated EPDs on the animals registered, which will be the average of their parent’s EPDs.  
  • Contribution to Genetic Improvement — Data from members participating in THE will be the only  Data submitted by members not enrolled in THE will not be used in the genetic evaluation because there is a possibility the entire contemporary group was not turned in, therefore, biasing the contemporary group.  data used in the genetic evaluation.

 

THE Enrollment ~ 4 Options Available

 

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Did you know that there are now four Options offered to members participating in Total Herd Enrollment?  Each Option is unique and how you enroll/pay for your dams determines how data will be delivered and reported on the yearly calf crop.  It is highly recommended to evaluate your individual herd goals to better select the Option that will best suit your operation’s needs. Whether you are a seedstock or commercial producer, one of the Options below is bound to be a fit for you!

Key Points about THE

  • Once you enroll your dams and select an Option, they remain in the Option you have chosen until the following year when you submit a new inventory and are able to select a different Option.
  • Participating in any of the four Options requires every dam to be enrolled on inventory and a calf/productivity code to be reported every year.
  • All Simmental registered dams have to be enrolled in the SAME Option, you may not pick and choose Options when it comes to the registered Simmental dams.  Dams of other breeds and commercial cows may be enrolled in any of the Options, regardless of how the registered Simmental dams are enrolled.
  • Concerning ET calves raised in cooperator herds. Since the recip dam is not listed on a THE inventory, when you register the ET calf you will leave the recip dam information blank, record the donor dam and sire of the calf and it will invoice your account per ET calf registered based on which Option your herd is enrolled in. For example, if your herd is enrolled in Option A, you will be invoiced $15.00/ET calf registered.
  • Donor dams need to be enrolled on inventory as long as they are alive and being managed within your herd.  If the donor dam is deceased or has been sold, she needs to be removed from inventory with the appropriate code.  You will still be able to register frozen embryos in the future if need be.

Option A

  • Every dam enrolled on inventory for $15.00/dam/year
  • Calves born in enrollment year and meeting all registration requirements are registered for FREE
  • Performance-based EPDs returned on all calves, regardless if they are registered or reported
  • This Option fits herds where the majority of the calf crop is registered(>40%) and EPDs are utilized in selection decisions

Option B

  • Every dam enrolled on inventory for FREE
  • Age-dependent calf registration fees
    • Under 10 months of age = $30.00
    • 10 to 15 months of age = $40.00
    • Over 15 months of age = $50.00
  • Performance-based EPDs returned on registered calves only
  • This Option fits herds where less than 40% of the calf crop is registered and EPDs are NOT utilized in selection decisions

Option C

  • Every dam enrolled on inventory for $7.50/dam/year
  • Age-dependent calf registration fees(same as Option B)
    • Under 10 months of age = $30.00
    • 10 to 15 months of age = $40.00
    • Over 15 months of age = $50.00
  • Performance-based EPDs returned on all calves, regardless if they are registered or reported
  • This Option fits herds where EPDs are utilized in selection decisions but registration papers are not necessary on the calves. If you start registering more than 5% of the calf crop each year, take a look at Option A, it might suit your operation better.

Option D (CM)

  • Every dam is enrolled on inventory for a *$500 whole herd fee. *This yearly enrollment fee does not include any costs associated with entering your herd data into the ASA database.
  • Age-dependent calf registration fees(same as non-THE members)
    • Under 10 months of age = $42.00
    • 10 to 15 months of age = $52.00
    • Over 15 months of age = $62.00
  • Performance-based EPDs returned on heifers, regardless if they are registered or reported.  There will also be average group EPDs reported on the steers. NO EPDs will be displayed on bull calves.
  • This Option fits herds where commercial producers are interested in receiving EPDs on their replacement heifers. Commercial producers must also be willing/able to collect and submit individual data along with identifying a sire for each calf, either through parental validation, single sire pasture exposures or AI records.

If you have questions or wish to discuss your specific herd goals please call ASA at 406.587.4531 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

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Reporting disposition scores at weaning or yearling is now available under HerdBook Services. When reporting calf data, select the weaning/yearling tab and look for the column labeled DOCILITY. If you click on the column header (DOCILITY) the BIF disposition scores will appear.

1 = Docile. Mild disposition. Gentle and easily handled. Stands and moves slowly during processing. Undisturbed, settled, somewhat dull. Does not pull on headgate when in chute. Exits chute calmly.

2 = Restless. Quieter than average, but may be stubborn during processing. May try to backout of chute or pull back on headgate. Some flicking of tail. Exits chute promptly.

3 = Nervous. Typical temperment is manageable, but nervous and impatient. A moderate amount of struggling, movement and tail flicking. Repeated pushing and pulling on headgate. Exits chute briskly.

4 = Flighty(Wild). Jumpy and out of control, quivers and struggles violently. May bellow and froth at the mouth. Continuous tail flicking. Defecates and urinates during processing. Frantically runs fence line and may jump when penned individually. Exhibits long flight distance and exits chute wildly.

5 = Aggressive. Maybe similar to score 4, but with added aggressive behavior, fearfulness, extreme agitation, and continuous movement which may include jumping and bellowing while in chute. Exits chute frantically and may exhibit attack behavior when handled alone.

6 = VeryAggressive. Extremely aggressive temperament. Thrashes about or attacks wildly when confined in small, tight places. Pronounced attack behavior.

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ASA Publication Staff

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Nancy Chesterfield

Nancy Chesterfield

National Ad Sales Coordinator
the Register:  406.587.2778 
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Rebecca Price

Rebecca Price

 

Advertising Coordinator / Editorial Assistant
the Register: 406.587.2778
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Jim Largess

jim Largess

General Manager
the Register: 406.587.2778
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Rachel Endecott, Ph.D.

Rachel Endecott, Ph.D.
Managing Editor
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 Jackie Atkins, Ph.D.

Jackie Atikins, Ph.D.
Managing Editor
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Dan Rieder

Dan Rieder
Consulting Editor
406.587.2778
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Lilly Brogger


Editor
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Emme Troendle


Editor 
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Cynthia Conner

Art Director
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Joel Coleman

Design and Production
the Register: 406.587.2778
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Tiffany Paulson

Catalog Services Assistant
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 Kathy Shafer

Media Communications Coordinator, 
Website Administrator
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Wade Shafer, PhD.

Wade Shafer, PhD.

Executive Vice President
Phone: 406.570.6795
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Steve McGuire

Chief Operations Officer
Cell: 406.587.4531
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Linda Kesler

Linda Kesler

Chief Financial Officer/Human Resources
Phone: 406.587.4531
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ASA Staff

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Customer Service Specialists

Customer Service Specialists

For assistance with registrations, transfers, DNA, CHR, Total Herd Enrollment, and Herdbook Services. Phone: 406.587.4531

  Katelyn Nelson
Katelyn Gould
Membership & Herdbook Services; Web Entry Support
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406.587.4531
 
Sara Unruh
Frontline Customer & Herdbook Services
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Phone: 406.587.4531

Tiffany Paulson
Frontline Customer & Herdbook Services; Web Support
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Phone: 406.587.4531
         
 
Emme Troendle 
Herdbook Services & THE Support Services
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Phone: 406.587.4531
 
Carla Stephens
Accounts Receivable
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Phone: 406.587.4531


Bailey Abell
FPC and SPC Services
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Phone: 406.587.4531

   
Lilly Platts
DNA Services
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Phone: 406.587.4531
 
Lauren Skoglund
DNA Services
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Phone: 406.587.4531

Molly Diefenbach
DNA Services 
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Phone: 406.587.4531

Data Entry Support

Data Input Services


Cindy Newell
Data Input Services, Ultrasound, Error Resolution
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Heidi Todd
Data Input Services; Ultrasound; Other Breed/Foreign Registrations
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Marni Gaskill
Data Input Services
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Amber Coila

Amber Coila
Data Input Services, THE & Carcass Data
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Administration

 Administration

Wade Shafer, PhD.
Wade Shafer, PhD.
Executive Vice President
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Phone: 406.570.6795

 

Linda KeslerLinda Kesler
Chief Operations/ Financial Officer
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Phone: 406.587.4531 
  
Steve McGuire
Consultant
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Phone: 406.587.4531

 

           

 

Technical and Programming Services

Technical Team 


Sheldon Ross
Lead Developer and Systems Administrator
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Jordan Bowman
Jordan Bowman
Developer/Lead IGS
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Mary Hoagland
Developer and Technical Support
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Kenneth Beartusk
Programmer
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  Kathy Shafer
Kathy Shafer
Media Communications Coordinator,
Website Developer
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Genomicist & Geneticist

 

Genomicist/Geneticist


Mahdi Saatchi, PhD.
IGS Lead Genomicist
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Randi Culbertson, Ph.D.
IGS Lead Geneticist
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ASA Directors

 

ASA Directors 

 
Chip Kemp
Director, ASA and IGS Commercial and Industry Operations
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Phone: 573.239.0524
Luke Bowman 
Luke Bowman
Director, Member Events & International Operations
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Phone: 765.993.6681
Jackie Atikins, PhD, 
Jackie Atkins, Ph.D.
Director, Science and 
Education Operations
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Phone: 406.587.4531
 
Rachel Endecott, Ph.D.
Director, DNA Programs and Youth Development
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Phone: 406.587.4531

Lane Giess
Director, Commercial & Non-traditional Data Programs and Special Projects
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Phone: 320-293-1647
Jannine Story
Director, Performance Data Programs
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Phone: 406.587.4531

Darla Aegerter
Youth Programs and ASF Manager
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Phone: 402-643-8122
 
Bert Moore, Ph.D.
State Association Liaison
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Phone: 701.541.5035
 

     

 


 

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Registration Data Submission

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INFORMATION NEEDED FOR REGISTRATION
The following is a brief explanation of the information required to register a Simmental or Simbrah animal. This information should be submitted on application forms (Herdbook Services) provided by the Association. Click here for the document. Or you can register online at: http://www.herdbook.org

CALF IDENTIFICATION
The Calf's tattoo ~ brand and location. This is a permanent identification of up to six characters put on each calf by its owner. If you have purchased a prefix, you may use over six characters. Tattoos or brands must be unique to each animal; therefore, no two animals in a herd can share the same brand or tattoo. A letter designating the year the calf was born must be included in the tattoo or brand. The only letters not used by ASA are I, O, Q and V.  Click here for more information on ASA Year-Letter Identification System.

 

ASA Year-Letter Identification System


APPENDIX 2.2, INTERNATIONAL YEAR/LETTER DESIGNATIONS FOR
ANIMAL IDENTIFICATION
International letters are designated for each year of birth. This option is easy to use in conjunction with numbers.
For example, S001 and S002 might be used to indicate the first and second calf born in the year 2006.

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
S T U W X
2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Y Z A B C
2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
D E F G H


The calf's birth date and sex
Single or multiple birth code: Please designate the type of birth for this animal. If you have twins TO is a twin of the opposite sex and TS is a twin of the same sex. Frozen embryos use FE and fresh embryos use ET. There are special DNA typing requirements for the dam and sire of embryo transplant offspring. See ASA Rules and By-Laws.

PARENTAGE
Dam's ASA registration number: This is a unique number assigned by the Association to a dam at the time she was registered. If the dam is not registered with ASA, then a permanent ASA identification # is assigned. Required information needed is Tattoo #, year of birth, and her percentage breeds such as 100 Angus or 1/2 Angus and 1/2 Hereford (name of an animal is not a valid identification marker).
Sire's ASA registration number: This is a unique number assigned by the Association to the sire at the time he was registered. The sire must be registered in the ASA, Herdbook Services before a calf can be registered. Breeders using sires of another breed can register calves as Simmental provided the other breed sire is registered with: (a) the breed association for the sire; (b) with ASA; and the dam is a registered Simmental.

WEIGHTS
Weaning weights: The calf's actual weaning weight and date are no longer required for registration; the breeder is encouraged to report this information if they have it. Weaning is recommended between 160 and 250 days of age. For contemporary groups, weaning must be taken the same day.
Yearling weights: Breeders are encouraged to supply this information if they have it providing they have also reported the weaning weight and date. Yearling is recommended between 330 and 440 days of age. Here again, for contemporary groups, yearling must be taken the same day for all calves.

AUTHORIZATION
Signature of the owner: The signature (of an authorized representative) of the person requesting registration verifies the accuracy of the information and gives the Association authority to enter this animal into the ASA, HerdBook Services.
Signature of the breeder: The breeder's name and signature (of an authorized representative), if different than the person registering the calf, are required. The breeder is the person who owned the dam at the time she was bred. If breeding or calf-at-side information was supplied at the time of transferring the dam, the breeder's signature is not required on the ASA, Herdbook Services application. If the calf is the result of an embryo and the breeder is not the applicant, then the calf has to be parentage verified by DNA analysis. Click here for information on the testing process and parental validation.


Requesting registration certificate: A registration certificate will be issued if a check is placed in the registration (Reg) column, on the far right-hand side of the form. By placing a "T" instead of a check, you may request to register and transfer this animal.
The buyer's name, address, and date of sale must be filled in on the application below the calf's information. If your transfer animal is a cow, breeding information is required.


Naming the calf: Now is the time to report a name for the calf; keep in mind, you are allowed to use only twenty-four characters including spaces. Names should be letters only; characters not eligible for use within an animal’s name are, ", ',?, ,,@, #, ^, *, (), +, =,;,:,!, %, $, <, >. Also, if you are using a prefix, it has to be available and approved by ASA; the fee for purchasing a fix is $10.00.Please contact our processing team for additional details at 1-406-587-4531.

PAYMENT
Self-billing worksheets: These worksheets are available to help determine the current fees. Since ASA operates on a cash basis, processing cannot be completed until payment is received; we do accept Visa, Discover, and Master Cards. The performance calculation fee will be charged on all calves submitted for the first time; however, if the calf is dead, no fee is incurred.

OTHER
Performance calculations: The registration application is also a form that is used to supply herd performance records. Breeders are encouraged to list data on all calves in the herd, not just the ones to be registered. By reporting information on all calves born (steers, heifers and bulls) breeders get a more complete picture of the performance of his herd, is more likely to qualify for the performance advocate award program and contributes to ASA's breed-wide evaluation system. The ASA performance registry system automatically calculates adjusted weights, within-herd ratios and Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) on all animals submitted.

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